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Григорий Клюшников

If you're a decent software engineer, your assumptions will be:
- "everyone uses dialup over a shitty phone line that goes to one of those electromechanical telephone exchanges from 60s" instead of "the internet is fast enough these days"
- "everyone MAYBE has 8 GB of storage on their phone, half of which is taken by the OS" instead of "storage is cheap and 100 MB per app is okay, grow up, it's {{ current_year }}"
- "your user won't give a shit about your 'developer experience' and how 'beautiful' your code is" instead of "Kotlin and React and Electron are required, no one uses raw platform APIs/native controls/whatever anymore because it's so EASY to develop with all these new abstractions"

  Robbie 🇧🇪
  Григорий Клюшников

Robbie 🇧🇪, of course. As demonstrated by Apple last year in the area of industrial design

  Paul Wilde
@grishka @bouncepaw I've been saying "We don't need more powerful computers, we need more efficient software" a lot recently to #BigTech brands - it seems right to put it here too
  voxel

@grishka @bouncepaw common is the engineer that thinks this way, rare is the project manager. the majority of developers are not hostile to actual use-cases, it is the budgets, both money and time, that don't care.

  Григорий Клюшников

voxel, actually no. A good engineer knows how to get the job done within given constraints. Knowing your own limits, and limits of the technologies you're using, is an indispensable part of engineering. The IT industry, however, thinks that it's absolutely fine to hire hundreds of junior developers who have no idea what they're doing, and put them in charge of critical decisions.

I know a guy who learned React but didn't learn JS. I built the backend for a simple app he had an idea for, he did the frontend. I had to explain him what XMLHttpRequest is, then watched him repeatedly try and fail to compose a valid URL with required parameters as the thing ran on my laptop through ngrok.

voxel, actually no. A good engineer knows how to get the job done within given constraints. Knowing your own limits, and limits of the technologies you're using, is an indispensable part of engineering. The IT industry, however, thinks that it's absolutely fine to hire hundreds of junior developers who have no idea what they're doing, and put them in charge of critical decisions.

  voxel

@grishka @bouncepaw that's a great example of someone lacking basic domain knowledge.

But there are also good engineers who work within business constraints and implement the kind of inefficiencies you talk about because the business won't allocate enough development time for a better solution. The reason for so many places using huge bloat.js libraries is they're faster, cheaper, flashier than bespoke solutions.

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